Your injury case may be the first interaction you ever have with the adversarial legal process. If you are like most of our clients, you may have received a traffic ticket, finalized a marriage or negotiated business contracts.

Yes: These procedures involve the justice system in some way. Traffic court may require you to appear. Marriages involve civil authority figures. You realize business deals with legal contracts. However, none of them prepare you for the complexity and contentiousness of personal injury court.

The other side is not working with you

Try as they might to seem reasonable or friendly, your opponents in a personal injury case are not on your side. They are working to protect their own interests.

Most will not lie to you directly. However, they will probably focus entirely on the small portion of interests that you share with them — quick resolution, low-stress processes and so on. If you ignore your other needs, such as full payment for suffering and medical bills, you might not get the compensation you deserve.

The system is not patient

In both technical and practical terms, there is a time limit on bringing an effective case. On one hand, you have constantly-shifting court schedules, as well as the statute of limitations for your particular action. On the other hand, you have evidence — witness testimony, crash-site inspections, documentation and so on — that degrades over time.

The information does not present itself

Effective legal cases need facts. The more information you have, the more likely you are to negotiate or litigate a fair deal. However, you have to do some work to collect this data. Sometimes, that means a review of evidence. Other times, you would want to perform new investigations.

Injury court is an experience that demands tenacity, strategic planning and dedicated effort. There is no easy solution in the vast majority of complex cases, such as medical malpractice, truck accidents or product liability  — but there could be a way to reach a fair deal.